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Geometry Data type in SQL Server 2005

On Database » Microsoft SQL Server

5,208 words with 3 Comments; publish: Thu, 05 Jun 2008 11:28:00 GMT; (250249.02, « »)

Does SQL Server 2005 have a geometry data type?

I am trying to figure out to use SQL Server 2005 or Oracle

The primary requirement is to be able to use any GIS software in the development of a new workflow, to access data, analyze and map data stored in a database.

The following is what I was able to find on the web.

While both Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server support the storage and maintenance of geo-spatial information, each vendor has chosen a fundamentally different approach to the implementation of this capability.

Oracle has developed a geometry data type that is fully integrated with the underlying Oracle 9i kernel. Oracle allows users to interact directly with the database using SQL language. In addition, Oracle has published the structure of its geometry, making it an open specification. Any GIS software is capable accessing the data stored in Oracle. In addition, all business rules for data and geo-spatial data integrity is built into this model, and any access, input, edits or other interaction must adhere to the rules that are designed in the database no matter the application accessing the database.

Conversely, Microsoft has not developed a geometry object in SQL Server. Each GIS vendor is therefore responsible for developing a method for storing GIS information in this database. Thus, Intergraph, ESRI, and MapInfo have developed their own binary geometry structures to allow them to store geo-spatial information in SQL Server. This approach makes the geo-spatial information dependent on the GIS software that is used.

Can anyone please help me!

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  • 3 Comments
    • docsql wrote:

      > Does SQL Server 2005 have a geometry data type?

      > I am trying to figure out to use SQL Server 2005 or Oracle

      > The primary requirement is to be able to use any GIS software in the development of a new workflow, to access data, analyze and map data stored in a database.

      > The following is what I was able to find on the web.

      > While both Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server support the storage and maintenance of geo-spatial information, each vendor has chosen a fundamentally different approach to the implementation of this capability.

      > Oracle has developed a geometry data type that is fully integrated with the underlying Oracle 9i kernel. Oracle allows users to interact directly with the database using SQL language. In addition, Oracle has published the structure of its geometry, maki

      ng it an open specification. Any GIS software is capable accessing the data stored in Oracle. In addition, all business rules for data and geo-spatial data integrity is built into this model, and any access, input, edits or other interaction must adhere t

      o the rules that are designed in the database no matter the application accessing the database.

      > Conversely, Microsoft has not developed a geometry object in SQL Server. Each GIS vendor is therefore responsible for developing a method for storing GIS information in this database. Thus, Intergraph, ESRI, and MapInfo have developed their own binary g

      eometry structures to allow them to store geo-spatial information in SQL Server. This approach makes the geo-spatial information dependent on the GIS software that is used.

      >

      >

      There is no specific datatype. That doesn't prevent you storing

      geo-spacial data as your post explains. You can define your own complex

      datatypes in SQL Server.

      David Portas, SQL Server MVP

      Whenever possible please post enough code to reproduce your problem.

      Including CREATE TABLE and INSERT statements usually helps.

      State what version of SQL Server you are using and specify the content

      of any error messages.

      SQL Server Books Online:

      http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/ms130214(en-US,SQL.90).aspx

      #1; Thu, 05 Jun 2008 11:29:00 GMT
    • There is no specific datatype. That doesn't prevent you storing

      geo-spacial data as your post explains. You can define your own complex

      datatypes in SQL Server.

      David Portas, SQL Server MVP

      Whenever possible please post enough code to reproduce your problem.

      Including CREATE TABLE and INSERT statements usually helps.

      State what version of SQL Server you are using and specify the content

      of any error messages.

      SQL Server Books Online:

      http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/ms130214(en-US,SQL.90).aspx

      #2; Thu, 05 Jun 2008 11:30:00 GMT